“Claims that the technology will be used to track people are inaccurate” Paul Sund

May 11, 2010 the Oklahoma House which previously passed HB 2569 by a wide margin (76-13 with 12 excused) failed to get enough votes to override the Governor’s Veto of the Radio Frequency ID bill.

Henry spokesman Paul Sund thanked the lawmakers for reviewing the legislation and sustaining the governor’s veto.

“It made no sense to prospectively ban technology that can provide future benefits,” Sund said. “Claims that the technology will be used to track people are inaccurate.”

Read more about the failed veto override vote on May 11, 2010 in this Tulsa World article

SIA CEO Richard Chace says in his letter to Gov. Henry;

“Unfortunately, this legislation reflects common misperceptions about RFID applications that are based upon twisted facts and emotions generated by ill-informed “privacy rights” advocates.”

And

“Governor, please be assured that safeguarding the privacy of personal information collected through government-issued identification documents is of paramount concern to our membership”. Read the letter

More; Oklahoma Law Makers Led Astry...

How long till the lies our trusted official told us becomes painfully apparent to Oklahomans?

The clock is ticking as the use of RFID for TRACKING purposes accelerate. How long until the people in this state are mandated to carry the devious devices?  Anyone want to place their bets?

Japanese company NEC wowed technophiles and horrified privacy advocates earlier this year with electronic billboards that use facial recognition technology to identify the age and gender of passers-by, tailoring the ads they display to fit the demographic. Now IBM researchers in the UK are taking that notion even further, taking advantage of new technologies to delve deeper into the personal data of people on the street, tailoring advertisements that can even call the subject by name.

The billboards they are developing rely on the RFID chips that are increasingly being built into credit cards and cell phones as a means of storing data that is accessible by contact-free sensors (like the “touch pay” feature on some credit and debit cards that doesn’t require the user to swipe). A sensor on the billboard picks up on that RFID signal as the cardholder passes by, tapping information like name, age, gender, shopping habits, and personal preferences.

read more

“Fascism should more appropriately be called Corporatism because it is a merger of State and corporate power.”

Benito Mussolini

 

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One response to ““Claims that the technology will be used to track people are inaccurate” Paul Sund

  1. Oh here in Oklahoma, that’s sad. There has been tech around for a while that would let a shopping mall know what radio station you are listening to when ya enter the parking lot. They used the info for marketing, just like what they want to do with the RFID. They collect the data, sell it to marketers, then pass some money to the slime bag politicians… Did I mention that I hate the nanny state….

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