Tag Archives: RFID

Okla. Legislative Action: Three Important Privacy Protection Bills and What You Can Do to Help

Kaye Beach

Feb. 23, 2013

**Corrected!  I was in a huge rush when I posted this and left off about half of the info.  Apologies.  It is fixed now. ***

Thank to all who attended today’s privacy rally at the state capitol event!

It’s true-ALL Oklahomans value their privacy!  Young, old, right, left and even some that cannot be so easily defined, turned out to stand up for their right to be let alone.  We busted paradigms, expanded our networks, made new connections and put Big Brother in Oklahoma on notice.  And we have only just begun to fight.

If you missed the  Intenational Day of Privacy event at the state capitol today but want to help, here is our ation items on important privacy protecting legislation active in Oklahoma.  In a nutshell, these bills cover drones, phones and RFID.

HB1559 (the last item on the list) is actually the most time sensitive of the three bills.  Please send your emails out this weekend and follow op with calls on Moday morning if you can.

 

1.House Bill 1556-the Oklahoma Unmanned Aerial Surveillance Act

HB 1556 by Rep. Paul Wesselhoft requires law officers, absent an emergency, to obtain a warrant first before using drones for surveillance purposes and prohibits the state from outfitting drones with weapons.

The FAA estimates as many as 30,000 drones could be flying in US skies by 2020 and Oklahoma is poised to become a state leader in the drone industry.  In fact, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security launched one of its first test flights for civil use of drones over the skies of Oklahoma in December 2012.

Drones are capable highly advanced surveillance. Law enforcement drones can carry various types of equipment including live-feed video cameras, facial recognition, automatic license plate readers, infrared cameras and more.  Drone manufacturers admit some are designed to carry “less lethal” weapons such as Tasers or rubber bullets and law enforcement has openly expressed interest in utilizing these weapons.

HB1556 will be heard in the House Aerospace and Energy Committee.(contact info below)  Call and tell them that you want them to support HB 1556 for these reasons:

  • Drones should be deployed by law enforcement only with a warrant, in an emergency, or when there are specific and articulable grounds to believe that the drone will collect evidence relating to a specific criminal act.
  • Images should be retained only when there is reasonable suspicion that they contain evidence of a crime or are relevant to an ongoing investigation or trial.
  • Usage policy on domestic drones should be decided by the public’s representatives, not by police departments, and the policies should be clear, written, and open to the public.
  • Use of domestic drones should be subject to open audits and proper oversight to prevent misuse.
  • Domestic drones should not be equipped with lethal or non-lethal weapons.

Aerial, warrantless surveillance is a violation of our Fourth Amendment rights and our right to privacy!

2.House Bill 1557 – the Geolocation Information Protection Act

HB 1557 by Rep. Paul Wesselhoft requires a warrant for law enforcement access to cellphone data except in certain emergency situations.

All cell phones register their location with cell phone networks several times a minute, and this function cannot be turned off while the phone is getting a wireless signal. Our travels reveal many intimate details about our lives.  Do you drink or go to bars, how about church?  Are you faithful to your spouse?  What medical treatment are you receiving? Are you politically active and if so, what political groups do you associate with?

HB1557 has been sent to the House Aerospace and Energy Committee but has not been scheduled to be heard yet.  Please call or email the Chairman of this committee and ask that HB1557 be scheduled. Then contact the members of this committee and ask them to please support HB1557.  Tell them that:

·         The government should have to obtain a warrant based upon probable cause before tracking cell phones

Warrantless cell phone tracking is
not permitted under the US Constitution and it is a grave violation of our
privacy

Oklahoma House Aerospace and Energy Committee Members

Chair Rep. John Trebilcock  johntrebilcock@okhouse.gov

(405) 557-7362

Rep. Weldon Watson  weldon.watson@okhouse.gov

(405) 557-7330

Rep. Don Armes donarmes@okhouse.gov (405) 557-7307

Rep. Mike Brown  mikebrown@okhouse.gov  (405) 557-7408

Rep. David Brumbaugh david.brumbaugh@okhouse.gov

(405) 557-7347

Rep. Marian Cooksey   mariancooksey@okhouse.gov

(405) 557-7342

Rep. Scott Inman scott.inman@okhouse.gov   (405) 557-7370

Rep. Steve Kouplen steve.kouplen@okhouse.gov  (405) 557-7306

Rep. Randy McDaniel  randy.mcdaniel@okhouse.gov

(405) 557-7409

Rep. R.C. Pruett  rcpruett@okhouse.gov  (405) 557-7382

Rep. Mike Sanders mike.sanders @okhouse.gov  (405) 557-7407

Rep. Ben Sherrer bensherrer@okhouse.gov  (405) 557-7364

Rep. Gary W. Banz  garybanz@okhouse.gov (405) 557-7395

Rep. David Brumbaugh david.brumbaugh@okhouse.gov

(405) 557-7347

Rep. Lee Denney leedenney@okhouse.gov  (405) 557-7304

Rep. Charlie Joyner charlie.joyner@okhouse.gov

(405) 557-7314

Rep. Steve Martin  stevemartin@okhouse.gov  (405) 557-7402

Rep. Jerry McPeak  jerrymcpeak@okhouse.gov  (405) 557-7302

Rep. Mike Reynolds mikereynolds@okhouse.gov

(405) 557-7337

Rep. Colby Schwartz colby.schwartz@okhouse.gov

(405) 557-7352

Rep. Aaron Stiles aaron.stiles@okhouse.gov (405) 557-7386

Rep. Lisa J. Billy  lisajbilly@okhouse.gov  (405) 557-7365

Rep. Josh Cockroft  josh.cockroft@okhouse.gov

(405) 557-7349

Rep. Jeffrey W. Hickman  jwhickman@okhouse.gov

(405) 557-7339

Rep. Dan Kirby  dan.kirby@okhouse.gov  (405) 557-7356

Rep. Mark McBride  mark.mcbride@okhouse.gov

(405) 557-7346

Rep. Eric Proctor  eric.proctor@okhouse.gov  (405) 557-7410

Rep. Sean Roberts  sean.roberts@okhouse.gov  (405) 557-7322

Rep. Seneca Scott  seneca.scott@okhouse.gov  (405) 557-7391

Rep. Paul Wesselhoft (these are his bills so no need to contact unless you just want to give him a Thank You!)

3.House Bill 1559 – NO RFID IN OUR ID!

HB1559 by Rep. Paul Wesselhoft would prohibit the state Public Safety Department from installing Radio Frequency Identification tracking technology in a driver’s license or state-issued identification card.

HB1559 has been sent to the House Transportation Committee. However, the Chairman of the committee, Rep. Charlie Joyner, refuses to schedule the bill to be heard (which is very odd since he voted FOR this very same piece of legislation in the past!)

Please email or call Rep. Joyner the member of the Transportation Committee and ask that he, please give HB1559 a hearing. Do this right away! if this bill is not scheduled on Tuesday Feb. 26-it will die.

Chairman House Transportation Committee Rep. Charlie Joyner charlie.joyner@okhouse.gov 

(405) 557-7314

 

Tell him that:

  • The state of Oklahoma already      prohibits the implantation of RFID microchips in human beings.
  • RFID on our driver’s license and      state ID cards would be the next best thing to actually implanting them in      our bodies because we carry our ID documents with us everywhere we go.
  • RFID readers are becoming more      and more prevalent and will eventually enable tracking us wherever we go      revealing our travels, habits and associations.
  • Tagging and tracking of human      beings is inappropriate and violates our right to privacy.
  • AND remind him that he voted FOR this legislation before!

 

RFID is for inventory, NOT human beings

 

Action Alert! House Bill 1559 – NO RFID IN OUR ID

Kaye Beach

Feb, 22, 2013

House Bill 1559 – NO RFID IN OUR ID!

HB1559 by Rep. Paul Wesselhoft would prohibit the state Public Safety  Department from installing Radio Frequency Identification tracking  technology in a driver’s license or state-issued identification card.

What is RFID?  Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) chips are very small information technology devices that are attached or embedded into anything that needs to be tracked or identified. RFID is great for tracking of objects, goods, and inventory.

In 2007, the Govt. Accountability Office official warned that:

“Once a particular individual is identified through an RFID tag, personally identifiable information can be retrieved from any number of sources and then aggregated to develop a profile of the individual. Both tracking and profiling can compromise an individual’s privacy”

HB1559 has been sent to the House Transportation Committee. However,  the Chairman of the committee, Rep. Charlie Joyner, refuses to schedule  the bill to be heard (which is very odd since he voted FOR this very  same piece of legislation in the past!)

Please email or call Rep. Joyner the member of the Transportation Committee and ask that he please give HB1559 a hearing. Do this right away! If this bill is not  scheduled on Tuesday Feb. 26-it will die.

Chairman House Transportation Committee Rep. Charlie Joyner charlie.joyner@okhouse.gov  (405) 557-7314

Tell him that:

• The state of Oklahoma already prohibits the implantation of RFID microchips in human beings.

• RFID on our driver’s license and state ID cards would be the next  best thing to actually implanting them in our bodies because we carry  our ID documents with us everywhere we go.

• RFID readers are  becoming more and more prevalent and will eventually enable tracking us wherever we go revealing our travels, habits and associations.

• Tagging and tracking of human beings is inappropriate and violates our right to privacy.

• AND remind him that he voted FOR this legislation before!

RFID is for inventory, NOT human beings!

Drones, Phones and RFID; PRIVACY Unites Left and Right in Oklahoma

ok dragonfly

Kaye Beach

Jan. 10, 2013

Despite the uncomfortable level of political division among Americans, there are still issues that bring us together.

This legislative session the left and right are pulling together for privacy.  I couldn’t be more excited about this development becuase when the battle between our right to privacy and big corporation’s desire to make money intersect, our numbers are everything.

On Sat. Feb. 23rd at the Oklahoma State Capitol, we will have an opportunity to assemble and to demonstrate those numbers and make it very clear to our elected representatives that Oklahomans expect their privacy rights to be respected!

Speakers:

Amie Stepanovich, EPIC, the Electronic Privacy Information Center, on drones and privacy

Ryan Kiesel, Director, OK ACLU

Amanda Teegarden, Exec. Director od OK-SAFE  – Oklahomans for Sovereignty and Free Enterprise will be our Master of Ceremonies-

IDP13 OKC flyer

Here is a copy of this flyer for you to download and share!

International Day For Privacy Oklahoma City

If you would like to connect with others online who are excited about and are attending this event, check out Oklahomans For Fourth Amendment Rights at State Capitol on Facebook.

KFOR reports Feb. 5th, 2013:

Unlikely groups join forces to support privacy bills

The Oklahoma Chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union along with Rep. Paul Wesselhoft held a joint press conference at the State Capitol Tuesday to explain the three bills aimed at protecting the privacy rights of Oklahomans.

House Bill 1559: The first bill would prohibit the Department of Public Safety from installing RFID radio frequency identification in a driver’s license.

House Bill 1557: Another bill would require law enforcement, absent an emergency, to first obtain a warrant before they access the geo-location data stored by a cell phone.

House Bill 1556: Finally, the third bill would limit the ability of law enforcement to use drones for surveillance without a warrant. 

Read more from KFOR

http://kfor.com/2013/02/05/unlikely-groups-join-forces-to-support-privacy-bills/

Schools-Social Laboratories for Human Surveillance

Kaye Beach

Oct. 10, 2012

The latest story about Texas school children being tagged and tracked with active RFID tracking devices  (the passive variety is considered “a little less Big Brotherish.”) has caused some controversy.  We are told that this is no big deal, that the RFID tracking simply allows the school to more efficiently do what it already does-take attendance and keep track of students whose safety and well-being is entrusted to the school by parents. But there is much more going on here and the issue deserves to be examined in a broader context.

Here is an excellent article by David Rosen of AlterNet that pulls together a variety of news relating to the tracking and surveillance of students.  If you are even slightly uncomfortable about the implementation of these high tech schemes being unleashed on our children, you should read every word of this article which provides some much needed context to the individual stories that trickle down to us from time to time.

These children are the leaders of tomorrow and their experiences at school help serve to fix the values that they will carry with them into adulthood and they are being immersed in an environment saturated with sensors designed to supervise, control and correct them.  (Here are some other objections to student RFID tracking)

Rosen’s article covers RFID and GPS tracking, electronic monitoring devices being used on kids to combat obesity in New York, electronic monitoring of calories consumed in school cafeterias,  networked CCTV systems that are directly  accessible to police and disturbing abuse of student privacy through CCTV cameras,  school computers that use cameras to remotely spy on students in their own homes, federal funding of school surveillance and more.

I would like to add one thing to  Rosen’s litany; biometric identification such as finger scanning to make lunch lines more efficient 

Rosen writes;

Few parents or children are fully aware of the scope of the tracking and surveillance now going on in American schools. Three simple questions need to be addressed: What is happening to all the personal data captured about the students? How long it is being retained? And are school administrators providing it to law enforcement authorities or commercial vendors?

Here is the AlterNet article.

Kids Tagged With RFID Chips? The Creepy New Technology Schools Use to Track Everything Kids Do — And the Profit Motive Behind It

Texas Students Face Repercussions for Refusing RFID Tracking

Kaye Beach

Oct. 9, 2012

Are you OK with tracking kids via active RFID chips at school?  Some kids and parents in Texas are NOT OK with it and they are holding their ground. (article below)

Here are some of the objections parents and students might have against wearing and RFID tracking device (from Position Paper on the Use of RFID in Schools dated August 21, 2012 signed by a wide variety of civil liberties advocates);
• Dehumanizing uses: While there is an expectation of supervision and guidance in schools, monitoring the detailed behaviors of individuals can be demeaning. For example, RFID reading devices in school restrooms could monitor how long a student or teacher spends in a bathroom stall.
• Violation of free speech and association. RFID tracking software can monitor associations of RFID tags, which could dissuade individuals from exercising their rights to freedom of thought, speech and association. For example, students might avoid seeking counsel when they know their RFID tags will document their presence at locations like counselor and School Resource Officer (SRO) offices.
• Violation of conscience and religious freedom. Many individuals object to RFID systems on the basis of their deeply held philosophical or religious beliefs. Schools are required to make accommodations for students on the basis of these beliefs.
• Unauthorized use. While RFID systems may be developed for use in a school, the RFID tags may be read covertly anywhere by anyone with the right reading device. Since RFID reading devices work by silent, invisible radio waves and the reading devices can be hidden, unauthorized or covert uses can be nearly impossible to detect. In addition, information collected on systems could be shared or compromised without individuals’ knowledge or consent. For example, a student’s location could be monitored from a distance by a jealous
girlfriend or boyfriend, stalker, or pedophile. Individuals run this tracking risk any place they carry or wear a school-issued RFID tagged item—even miles from the campus.

Read more of the Position Paper on the Use of RFID in Schools

Texas School District Reportedly Threatening Students Who Refuse Tracking ID, Can’t Vote For Homecoming

Posted Oct. 8, 2012 at the Huffington Post

Weeks after Northside Independent School District in San Antonio rolled out its new “smart” IDs that tracks students’ geographic locations, the community is still at odds with the program.

The “Student Locator Project,” which is slated to eventually reach 112 Texas schools and close to 100,000 students, is in trial stages in two Northside district schools. In an effort to reduce truancy, the district has issued new student IDs with an embedded radio-frequency identification (RFID) chip that tracks the location of a student at all times.

The program officially launched October 1 at John Jay High School and Anson Jones Middle School. Without the badges — required to be worn around the neck — students cannot access common areas like the cafeteria or library, and cannot purchase tickets to extracurricular activities. WND reports that the district has threatened to suspend, fine or involuntarily transfer students who fail to comply and officials have noted that “there will be consequences for refusal to wear an ID card as we begin to move forward with full implementation.”

Read more

Smartworld: Identity Profiling With Radio Frequency

Kaye Beach

September 6, 2012

Excellent, information and reference packed article!  More than you ever wanted to know about RFID.

Published Sept. 4, 2012

Julie Beal, Contributor
Activist Post

RFID, or radio frequency identification (also known as near field communication, or NFC) is used for wireless communication between devices, one of which is a transmitter and the other is a receiver. This involves the use of low frequency radio waves passing between the devices; it is in widespread use, although the impact on health is rarely alluded to. RFID is being used for a multitude of applications involving sensing and communication of information, especially ID verification using smart cards/phones, miniscule sensors known as smart dust, bodily implants, and product tracking.

There are already many well-established ID Management companies who are also using or advocating RFID and biometrics. These companies are heavily involved in the emerging global identity ecosystem (eg, the NSTIC program, the work of the ITU, and the European initiatives, including STORK), and include Accenture, IBM, Verisign/Symantec and Oracle. The industry has grown significantly and the trend looks set to continue – especially considering the heavy investment by leading corporations like Google, IBM, and Microsoft.

The smart card industry is playing a leading role in identity management, indicating that in the near future the public will expect to manage their digitised identity with extrinsic devices such as contactless cards and mobile phones.

In Denver, for instance, Auraria Higher Education Center recently decided to issue new contactless smart cards to students (over 43,000 of them), and to staff. The cards will control door access using RFID, and will even serve as Visa debit cards. The plan is to eventually integrate the cards with other applications for student services, including parking, meal payment, library checkout, event management, emergency incidents, and lab and recreational tracking.

Read more

14 Incredibly Creepy Surveillance Technologies That Big Brother Will Soon Be Using To Spy On You

Kaye Beach

July 10, 2012

If we were making the technology conform to the laws intended to protect our rights rather than making the law conform to the capabilities of the technology, these things would not be such a concern.

1 “Pre-Crime” Surveillance Cameras

#2 Capturing Fingerprints From 20 Feet Away

#3 Mobile Backscatter Vans

#4 Hijacking Your Mind

#5 Unmanned Drones In U.S. Airspace

#6 Law Enforcement Using Your Own Cell Phone To Spy On You

#7 Biometric Databases

#8 RFID Microchips

#9 Automated License Plate Readers

#10 Face Reading Software

#11 Data Mining

#12 Street Lights Spying On Us?

#13 Automated ISP Monitoring Of Your Internet Activity

#14 Spying On Us Through Our Appliances

From Blacklisted News

Source: Michael Snyder, BLN Contributing Writer

Most of us don’t think much about it, but the truth is that people are being watched, tracked and monitored more today than at any other time in human history.  The explosive growth of technology in recent years has given governments, spy agencies and big corporations monitoring tools that the despots and dictators of the past could only dream of.  Previous generations never had to deal with “pre-crime” surveillance cameras that use body language to spot criminals or unmanned drones watching them from far above.  Previous generations would have never even dreamed that street lights and refrigerators might be spying on them.  Many of the incredibly creepy surveillance technologies that you are about to read about are likely to absolutely astound you.  We are rapidly heading toward a world where there will be no such thing as privacy anymore.  Big Brother is becoming all-pervasive, and thousands of new technologies are currently being developed that will make it even easier to spy on you.  The world is changing at a breathtaking pace, and a lot of the changes are definitely not for the better.

The following are 14 incredibly creepy surveillance technologies that Big Brother will soon be using to watch you….

Read on

Healthcare, RFID and Medical Devices: Worry or Not?

Kaye Beach

July 10, 2011

In this post I raise two issues related to RFID and medical devices.  RFID is a generic term for technologies that use radio waves to automatically identify people or objects.

One of these issues you shouldn’t worry about but the other might be cause for concern.

Although the assertion that the Affordable Care Act mandates that the majority of people receive a RFID chip implant has been soundly debunked but there has been a resurgence in the hoax.  It is concerning to see that otherwise cautious and credible people are falling for it and perpetuating this disinformation.  As I have stated elsewhere, creditability is essential and it is an all or nothing kind of a deal.

Here is the basic claim being made;

The Obama Health care bill under Class II (Paragraph 1, Section B) specifically includes ‘‘(ii) a class II device that is implantable.” Then on page 1004 it describes what the term “data” means in paragraph 1, section B:

‘‘(B) In this paragraph, the term ‘data’ refers to in
formation respecting a device described in paragraph (1),  including claims data, patient survey data, standardized analytic files that allow for the pooling and analysis of  data from disparate data environments, electronic health records, and any other data deemed appropriate by the Secretary”

What exactly is a class II device that is implantable? Lets see…

Approved by the FDA, a class II implantable device is a “implantable radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information.” The purpose of a class II device is to collect data in medical patients such as “claims data, patient survey data, standardized analytic files that allow for the pooling and analysis of data from disparate data environments, electronic health records, and any other data deemed appropriate by the Secretary.”

This sort of device would be implanted in the majority of people who opt to become covered by the public health care option.

link

The claim is faulty from the get go.  Although implantable RFID chips are a Class II device, the  aren’t the only implantable device that is a Class II medical device.

In the United States, medical devices are regulated by the FED, the Food and Drug Administration. Medical devices can be defined as any physical item useful for diagnostic, monitoring, or therapeutic purposes.

There are three classes of medical devices.  Devices are regulated according to their intended use and by level of risk posed to the patient with a Class I device being the most lightly regulated due their non invasive nature and slimmer possibility for harming a person and Class III being the most heavily regulated.  link Examples of Class I devices  include bandages and  hand held surgical instruments. Examples of Class II medical devices includes dental fillings, sutures, and yes, RFID implantable chips.

RFID chips are only one example of a Class II implantable device. 

What is a Class II medical device?

Class II devices have a higher potential to cause harm and require both general and special controls, such as special labeling, mandatory performance standards, and postmarket surveillance. These devices are typically nonimplanted, although some are partially invasive. Examples include x-ray machines, wheelchairs, infusion pumps, and surgical needles. Link

Also, the original (HR 3200)  bill did not mandate that anyone must have anything implanted. the language was actually proposing a national registry of medical devices  and furthermore this language was not included in the version (HR 3590) of the bill that actually passed into law.  A registry of medical devices certainly could be something to worry about but that is not what is being addressed by the above claims that are being passed  from person to person around like a bad rash.

Mark Lerner, co-founder of the Constitutional Alliance, researched the issue and provides this statement on his findings regarding the matter;

I have been asked if RFID (chips) implants are mandated as part of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (HR3590, Public Law 111-148) often referred to as “Obamacare”. The answer is “No”.

An earlier version of the legislation (HR3200, 111th Congress) did allow for class II devices that are “implantable” but that legislation never made it out of the House of Representatives.

Do not take my word for it; visit http://thomas.loc.gov/home/LegislativeData.php and select “advanced search”, then select 111th Congress (2009-2010) and enter the bill number HR3590.

You can do the same for HR3200 and find out that HR3200 never was passed, much less signed into law. If you follow the directions I have provided you will be able to read and do a word search for the word “implantable”in both of the pieces of legislation and determine the last Congressional action taken.

I want to say unequivocally there are times when incorrect information is shared not because people intentionally are attempting to mislead others but rather because we do not always do our homework before passing on emails and other information. Let the man or woman or has never shared erroneous information come forward today and you will find nobody including myself that has not committed this error.”

Now here is an issue that involves RFID and medical device that may warrant some legitimate concern;

Published July 10, 2012 in the RFiD Journal

FDA Issues Proposed Rules for Unique Identification System for Medical Devices

The medical manufacturing and health-care industries have 120 days to comment on the new rules, which will require many medical devices to carry a printed text identification number and bar-code label or RFID tag ID that would be stored on an FDA database.

Read more

The concern is that medical devices that are either worn or implanted into a person that carry a unique identification number whether it be by bar code, RFID or simply text printed on the device-is traceable and could be combined with other personal data.  I find the idea, on its face, to be worrisome and will be doing some addition reading on this issue.

For more information on the privacy  problems with item level RFID tagging, read;

Bye Bye Wal-Mart: Wal-Mart Radio Tags to Track Clothing

Reality Check for Real ID

Kaye Beach

Feb. 23, 2012

On Feb 14th I wrote an article entitled Are You Seeing Stars on Your State Driver’s License?  Say Hello to REAL ID

Janice Kephart, true believer in the Real ID cause and Director for National Security Policy at the Center for Immigration Studies, stopped by to leave a comment on my blog singing the praises of Real ID and denying that it is a national ID.  I was traveling when she left the comment and had little time and I will admit, little patience to respond to Ms. Kephart.  Fortunately, someone else stepped in and gave a great rebuttal to Kephart’s claims.  (You can read Gene’s reply at the bottom of the post in the comments section)

Paul Henry of Floridians against Real ID has been tireless in his activism and efforts to reverse the federal Real ID Act in his state for years now.  Paul is also a retired law enforcement officer and one that worked specifically on driver license fraud and other identity-related cases.  He too earned a visit from Janice Kephart  and his reply to her was most thoughtful as well as extremely thorough.  Highly recommended reading for anyone who wants to know the truth about Real ID.

Do you wonder;

  • Would Real ID have stopped the 9 11 hijackers?  Or illegal immigration?
  • Does Real ID require an RFID chip?
  • Is Real ID a “national ID”

Read Paul Henry’s reasoned reply!

An E-mail Conversation with a REAL ID Proponent

 

 

Oklahoma Anti-RFID Bill Meets Trouble with Rep. Steve Martin and Rep. Sue Tibbs

Kaye Beach

Feb 16, 2011

Our privacy will once again lose to these shenanigans.

HB1399 by Rep Wesselhoft would simply prohibit the use of RFID tracking devices in our state driver’s licenses and ID cards.

This is the third time that this very simple and very popular bill has been run in the Oklahoma state legislature.  The first time it passed overwhelmingly in the House and Senate only to be killed by Governor Brad Henry after a love letter from a powerful industry lobbyist.  (See  Meet the Chippers 2010 )People in Oklahoma from the Right to the Left supported this bill, our legislators supported this bill but the industry lobbyists had the final say.

Last session the heads of the Public Safety Committee just outright killed the bill and this session it appears that Rep. Steve “Robo Cop” Martin  is using the same old dirty lobbyists tricks to destroy the anti-RFID bill that we saw attempted in the first session the bill was run.  Rep. Sue “Big Momma Gov. Tibbs promises to kill the bill if the committee substitute that Rep. Martin has offered isn’t accepted.  (the amendment actually reverses the intent of HB1399)

From OK-SAFE posted Feb 16, 2012;

OK-SAFE Inc. – Evidence of the powerful RFID lobby in the Oklahoma Legislature, the bill prohibiting RFID tags in the OK drivers license will only be heard in committee if the author of the bill agrees to new language allowing RFID tags in the Oklahoma drivers license.

Rep. Steve Martin, vice-chair of the House Public Safety committee, has offered a proposed committee substitute for HB 1399, by Rep. Paul Wesselhoft.  Martin’s proposed language is a backdoor attempt to allow the state to imbed RFID tags in drivers licenses and state issued-identification cards, while limiting their use.

Currently, the state of Oklahoma does not allow RFID tags in their drivers licenses, despite the federal push to add them. (See prior post on this bill here and information on the REAL ID debacle here.)

If Wesselhoft refuses Martin’s new language, committee Chairman Rep. Sue Tibbs will not allow the bill a hearing.

Read more