Tag Archives: HB 2569

Enhanced Driver’s Licenses-RFID Great Tool for People Tracking AND Thieves

Kaye Beach

Nov. 8, 2011

RFID stands for Radio Frequency Identification, often it is referred to as “Auto ID”  That is because whenever it is comes into range of a RFID reader, it automatically coughs up its unique identification number and sometimes more.  RFID is a tracking device.  That is what it is used for. Tracking  inventory, livestock or anything that anyone wants to keep tabs on, this is what RFID does so well.  Despite all of the denials and even ridicule leveled at those who point out the great privacy and security weaknesses of this technology, the truth remains; RFID should never be coersively used on human beings.   Not on (or in) their person, clothing, library books, vehicles or any other items that they have associated with them.

The information in the following article and video is not new-anyone who has looked into the matter at all knows that the RFID chips can be read from afar, what is exciting about it is that the issue still raises concerns and that the media finds it interesting enough too cover.

There was a lot of attention paid to marketing this technology years ago.  The brilliant minds of marketers and public relations gurus studied the attitudes of people from various countries very carefully before prescribing a tailor made strategy to the Auto ID industry designed to gain the acceptance of these populations.  For the United States that advice was to make us feel that pervasive use of these tracking devices in our everyday live was inevitable.  That is how you get Americans to accept it, according to the masterminds of Fleishman-Hillard (slide 17)

Of course it is not inevitable.  Americans  need only to wave their tiny freedom loving fists and say “Back off”!

Former Oklahoma State Senator Kenneth Corn authored an Enhanced Driver’s License bill back in 2009 (it didn’t go anywhere) and the last two sessions in a row we have seen a widely popular anti- RFID bill killed for no other reason than the wishes of industry profiteers or on the ill-temperd whims of legislative committee heads.

This would be a  good article to share with your legislator.

Hopefully they will not be insulting like former Sen Tom Adelson who likening those with privacy concerns about RFID to people who wear tin foil hats.  I don’t know about you but I can tolerate a legislator with a prickly personality but the ones that are arrogant and too lazy to read a page for themselves just wear me out!

Enhanced Driver’s Licenses can be Scanned by up to 30 Feet

HotBedInfo, 11/08/2011

An episode on Global TV aired Sunday, January 25, 2011 about the dangers of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) chips found in Enhanced Driver’s Licenses, Passports, and Credit Cards.  The episode showed how anyone can put together simple electronics found online for a few dollars to grab your detailed information from as far as 30 feet away!

What is an enhanced driver’s license?

They are dual-purpose documents designed for the user’s convenience. In addition to serving as a typical driver’s license or ID card, they may be used to re-enter the U.S. at its land or sea ports when returning from Canada, Mexico, Bermuda or the Caribbean. This flexibility speeds your passage back across the border. They verify your identity and citizenship – no other proof is needed. Enhanced driver’s licenses and ID cards are among the federally approved border-crossing documents when entering the U.S. required under the Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative.

Enhanced Driver’s License ID Theft
These new Driver’s Licenses contain an RFID chip to allow speedy processing at border crossings.  Provinces of BC, Manitoba, and Ontario implemented them although they are not mandatory at this time.

A person could be sitting in a food court happily scanning away!  Granted that was 30 feet of open space but in a food court even within 10 feet, hundreds of people could be scanned.

Read more

Advertisements

Surveillance and Dissent in China

Kaye Beach

Chinese leaders look for ways to defuse unrest as revolt fizzles out

IN THE end, the call for a Chinese response to uprisings in the Middle East fizzled out, but leaders are clearly rattled by how quickly the Jasmine Revolution spread online and have called for new ways to defuse unrest.

Disgruntled citizens did gather in China’s major cities after the internet call went out, but the authorities were ahead of them. On Saturday they rounded up the major dissidents not already in jail and were a major presence in areas where protesters gathered.

Read more

Thousands of cameras watch China’s Uighurs, inhibiting discourse

URUMQI, China — Looking slowly around his own bedroom, the nervous Uighur man with hunched shoulders said he wasn’t sure whether he could speak openly about the Chinese government.

“Someone may be listening on the other side of any wall here,” said Anwar, a 50-year-old shopkeeper who didn’t want his last name made public. “We must think of our own safety.”
Read more: http://www.miamiherald.com/2011/02/21/2077540/thousands-of-cameras-watch-chinas.html#ixzz1EeF1Llq2

China has ways of making sure any unrest “fizzles out”  We are getting there.

Here’s a guy not content with making big bucks off selling surveillance tech to China so that it can control it’s citizens, he makes sure the state’s don’t have any protective legislation in place that would interfere with his organization being able to profit from the same technology here.

“I want to thank George Orwell for having the depth and foresight to plan my career” 1998 Richard Chace, SIA

SIA CEO Richard Chace Schmoozing

Recently in Oklahoma the powerful lobbying organization, SIA, swooped in and demolished a bill that would have kept RFID out of our identity documents.  This was a simple and well crafted bill that enjoyed bipartisan support and passed with a large majority through both houses.  All it lacked to become law was the Governor’s signature.  The CEO of the Security Industry Association used his considerable influence to make sure that the bill did not receive the Governor’s approval.

Read More

China’s All Seeing Eye

With the help of U.S. defense contractors, China is building the prototype for a high-tech police state. It is ready for export.

Read more

Oklahoma Beat the “Chippers”!

A refresher on the Anti Chipping Bill,  HB 2569;

For a more in depth review see “Meet The Chippers”

HOUSE BILL 2569    would have protected the privacy and dignity of Oklahoman’s by prohibiting the use of RFID chips on our state driver’s license and ID cards.


(I noticed that the Nebraska Grassroots are getting their yuks up at the chippers’ expense-Cheers!)



This popular bill passed both the House and the Senate and was sent to the Governor on 4/26/10.

HB 2569 was targeted from the beginning by an out-of-state special interest group called SIA (Security Industry Associations, in Alexandria, VA).

Later, legislator-turned-lobbyist Jim Dunlap, representing HID Global (a SIA member) attempted have the bill amended to allow for RFID tracking tags on our OK DL/IDs.

After much uproar the amendment was withdrawn.

4/26/10 SIA CEO Richard Chace sent a letter to the Governor asking him to veto HB 2569;

Henry vetoed the bill on 4/28/10.

The House ran a veto override on 5/11/10 which failed 69-19. [13 members were excused, several of whom walked the vote].

Although support was secured for a 2nd veto override attempt, House leadership balked and wouldn’t run it.

Now!  Here are the less than chipper “Chippers” after the election results rolled in Nov 2, 2010

Ken Corn gets a special honor because he wrote the bill in 2009 to try and slip the chip into our drivers licenses AND because Richie “the Chipper” Chace sent Ken Corn one of his special notes about it.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Richard Chace-Business is Booming

Radio Frequency ID Child Tagging Spreads

I am going to have to start a running tally of how many schools are using RFID to tag and track the students.

In the meantime, we may want to ask ourselves where we stand on this issue because I have a feeling we will be dealing with it soon.

Santa Fe uses radio frequency tracking badges

Published October 18, 2010 SANTA FE — Secondary students in the Santa Fe district are required to wear badges on campus that track their whereabouts using radio frequency identification technology.

School officials issued the badges this fall to ensure student safety and achieve more accurate attendance reporting.

Attendance rates haven’t been an issue in the district, but a reliable reporting system might allow Santa Fe to recover more state money from average daily attendance funding, district spokeswoman Patti Hanssard said. The monitoring system only tracks students on campus.

…Since issuing the tracking badges in 2008, Spring has received a $194,000 increase in attendance funding, Hanssard said.

Read More

I want to thank George Orwell for having the depth and foresight to plan my career”

Take a guess who issued that quote?



That would be Richard Chace, head honcho of the SIA, the lobbying group that asked our Governor to, pretty please, kill HB 2569 that was passed overwhelmingly through the Oklahoma State House and Senate.   The same Richard Chace, who was working with Sen Corn in 2009 to pass a bill making RFID chips mandatory in our driver’s licenses!  This was the bill, HB 2569,  that simply proposed to keep these devices off of our driver’s licenses and ID cards.  The same bill supported by people ranging from devout Christians to the ACLU.

Think your wishes as to what your state government will or will not force you to do, will be considered?  Not as long as we refrain from making this sort of UN-representative type of decision making  exceedingly painful for them.

Want to see where Oklahoma stands compared to other states regarding RFID tracking laws?

State Statutes Relating to Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) and Privacy

Click the link below that says “Meet the Chippers” and consider the votes of the legislators who sold us out to the man who thanks George Orwell for giving him a blue print to make his fortune on when you cast your votes on Nov 2.

Now, you might also remember that our wise legislators here in Oklahoma only a few months ago ridiculed, scoffed and denied the notion of tracking human beings via an RFID chip;

Sen. Tom Adelson ridicules those who object to human beings think to being tagging and tracked like livestock or inventory.

“Claims that the technology will be used to track people are inaccurate” Paul Sund

RFID to Track PEOPLE?! Cops, Big Government Extremists and Corporate Shills Deny the Possibility

Oklahoma Capitol Offenders 2010 HB 2569 Meet the “Chippers”

While one chip in your wallet now does not allow for effective tracking,  RFID technology  is intended to become ubiquitous.  We are already becoming laden with the chips.  Our clothing, various products and items we carry, library books, badges, ID’s and more harbor the devices.  As more and more readers are installed, the ability for the government to know your whereabouts, who you are with, what transactions you make and how you pay, will become painfully obvious.

Calif. bill would protect privacy of FasTrak users

Amazing!
Reported August 23, 2010 by the Associated Press;

The bill, SB1268, would prohibit transportation agencies from selling or sharing personal data and set penalties for those that violate the rules.

The bill also would require agencies to destroy data that could be linked to specific drivers.

The article says the bill has to go back to the Senate for final action but it looks like they got it through!
One more hurdle to clear-The “Governator” and the poisoned pen of Richard Chace.  Chase delivered the kiss of death to Oklahoma’s anti-RFID bill last session, as he has many similar bill all over the U.S.

See article posted on August 5, 2010 ; Will California Derail FasTrak’s Dash to Big Brother?

and

RFID to Track PEOPLE?!  Cops, Big Government Extremists and Corporate Shills Deny the Possibility

I’ll bet Mr. Fancy Pants  is drafting his letter to the Governor right now.

Stay Tuned…..

“Claims that the technology will be used to track people are inaccurate” Paul Sund

May 11, 2010 the Oklahoma House which previously passed HB 2569 by a wide margin (76-13 with 12 excused) failed to get enough votes to override the Governor’s Veto of the Radio Frequency ID bill.

Henry spokesman Paul Sund thanked the lawmakers for reviewing the legislation and sustaining the governor’s veto.

“It made no sense to prospectively ban technology that can provide future benefits,” Sund said. “Claims that the technology will be used to track people are inaccurate.”

Read more about the failed veto override vote on May 11, 2010 in this Tulsa World article

SIA CEO Richard Chace says in his letter to Gov. Henry;

“Unfortunately, this legislation reflects common misperceptions about RFID applications that are based upon twisted facts and emotions generated by ill-informed “privacy rights” advocates.”

And

“Governor, please be assured that safeguarding the privacy of personal information collected through government-issued identification documents is of paramount concern to our membership”. Read the letter

More; Oklahoma Law Makers Led Astry...

How long till the lies our trusted official told us becomes painfully apparent to Oklahomans?

The clock is ticking as the use of RFID for TRACKING purposes accelerate. How long until the people in this state are mandated to carry the devious devices?  Anyone want to place their bets?

Japanese company NEC wowed technophiles and horrified privacy advocates earlier this year with electronic billboards that use facial recognition technology to identify the age and gender of passers-by, tailoring the ads they display to fit the demographic. Now IBM researchers in the UK are taking that notion even further, taking advantage of new technologies to delve deeper into the personal data of people on the street, tailoring advertisements that can even call the subject by name.

The billboards they are developing rely on the RFID chips that are increasingly being built into credit cards and cell phones as a means of storing data that is accessible by contact-free sensors (like the “touch pay” feature on some credit and debit cards that doesn’t require the user to swipe). A sensor on the billboard picks up on that RFID signal as the cardholder passes by, tapping information like name, age, gender, shopping habits, and personal preferences.

read more

“Fascism should more appropriately be called Corporatism because it is a merger of State and corporate power.”

Benito Mussolini

 

RFID to Track PEOPLE?! Cops, Big Government Extremists and Corporate Shills Deny the Possibility

RFID can be used for tracking people?

But we have been assured that we are misunderstanding the ability of the technology by members of our state legislature, Mr. Fancy Pants himself, Richard Chase,  CEO of the Security Industry Association, and even the Department of Public Safety expressed dismay that anyone would think that they even harbored the thought of putting one of those blasted things in our must-carry ID documents;

Richard Chase

The whole thing is just a tempest in a tea pot, an absolutely CORNY idea!

Mr Chase’s assertions were compelling enough to convince Gov. Brad Henry to veto the anti-RFID bill even though it was overwhelming supported by Democrats and Republicans alike.  Even staunchly conservative Christians and the ACLU expressed grave concerns about this technology largely due to its inherent tracking ability.

RFID chips are sensors and  when they are sprinkled over almost everything their spying ability becomes profound.  Wal Mart recently announced that they would be embedding RFID in individual items (including your underwear) and yesterday I posted a story about the new plan to use them to monitor Cleveland’s garbage habits.

Now, they want to use them to track students.

The word of the day is UBIQUIITOUS

New Canaan Considers Tracking Devices for Students

Mon, Aug 23, 2010

 

In the tiny town of New Canaan, students might someday get tracking tags along with their textbooks.

 

No decisions have yet been made, but school officials plan to look into the possibility of adding radio frequency tags to student or staff ID cards, or place them on school property, like laptops, the New Canaan Advertiser reports.

The company that makes the devices is SecureRF Corporation, based in Westport. It has applied for a $100,000 grant from the National Science Foundation to conduct science research and wants New Canaan High School to use the technology, the Advertiser reports.

“We are looking to test this technology with a partner,” SecureRF’s founder and chief executive officer Louis Parks Parks said during a school board meeting last week. “The primary role we are looking for from you is the feedback and input.”

Read More

Oklahoma Capitol Offenders 2010 HB 2569 Meet the “Chippers”

RFID bill: Oklahoma Lawmakers Led Astray by the lobbyist from the SIA

May 11, 2010 the Oklahoma House which previously passed HB 2569 by a wide margin (76-13 with 12 excused) failed to get enough votes to override the Governor’s Veto of the Radio Frequency ID bill.

Do Oklahoma legislators really think using any sort of tracking device on documents that we must carry with us nearly everywhere is a good idea?

Henry spokesman Paul Sund thanked the lawmakers for reviewing the legislation and sustaining the governor’s veto.

“It made no sense to prospectively ban technology that can provide future benefits,” Sund said. “Claims that the technology will be used to track people are inaccurate.”

Read more about the failed veto override vote on May 11, 2010 in this Tulsa World article

I noticed that Mr. Sund does not deny that the technology can track individuals; he is simply stating that it won’t be. If that is the case then why even use it?.

Why should we take Mr. Sund’s word? Where does he get his information and what evidence does he provide to back up his claim?

We know that powerful technology industry lobbying group, the Security Industry Association, or SIA
had
an impact on the bill
and one would assume, Mr. Sund and Oklahoma lawmakers as well.

SIA CEO Richard Chace says in his letter to Gov. Henry;

“Unfortunately, this legislation reflects common misperceptions about RFID applications that are based upon twisted facts and emotions generated by ill-informed “privacy rights” advocates.”

And

“Governor, please be assured that safeguarding the privacy of personal information collected through government-issued identification documents is of paramount concern to our membership”. Read the letter

But when SIA CEO Richard Chace is speaking to investors his tune changes just a little;

“First and foremost my duty is to the SIA membership and to execute the “will” of the SIA Board of Directors. My role at SIA is to perpetuate and regularly articulate the association’s strategic mission and vision[. . . ]Our members primarily join because they find tremendous value connecting and networking with their peers, but they also recognize and like that our organization impacts government and public policy; that it offers a wide range of benefits that help grow their business. . .’

Who is SIA’s members?

We are repeatedly told that radio frequency technology is a necessary security feature.

But according to these and many more experts;
” the risks of eavesdropping, cloning, and skimming arguably open the e-Passport holder to greater risks than the original paper-based design.”

Security and Privacy Risks of Embedded RFID in Everyday Things: the e-Passport and Beyond

Who is running this show? DC Lobbyists or our state legislators?

With one quick search I turned up 7 SIA Lobby letters either interfering with state legislation like HB 2569 in Oklahoma or praising lawmakers for their fidelity to the Security Industry Associations’ cause.

2 of the 7 were addressed to Oklahoma officials!

I don’t know that there is any chance of competing with the beguiling Mr. Chace but there are ample sources that refute the industry tripe that Mr. Sund and some of our state legislators are trying to feed us. These opinions and studies bear repeating because apparently all of the statements, studies and demonstrations provided by security experts, scientists and researchers that show that this technology is not only insecure and inappropriate for human ID has not sunk in yet.

For starters, I suggest the Department of Homeland Security’s own Data Privacy and Integrity Advisory Committee;

“But for other applications related to human beings, RFID appears to offer little benefit when compared to the consequences it brings for privacy and data integrity.

Instead, it increases risks to personal privacy and security, with no commensurate benefit for performance or national security.”

The committee goes on to say;

Most difficult and troubling is the situation in which RFID is ostensibly used for tracking objects (medicine containers, for example), but can be in fact used for monitoring human behavior. These types of uses are still being explored and remain difficult to predict.

For these reasons, we recommend that RFID be disfavored for identifying and tracking human beings.

These statements are from the original report the committee issued which was presented to the full Advisory Committee on June 7, 2006, at a public meeting in San Francisco where it was not very well received.

According to this report

. . . it received a chilly reception by many representatives from companies selling RFID technology used in identification and credential applications, as well as from technology industry groups, because it came down hard on the use of RFID in identity documents.

“The powers that be took a good run at deep-sixing this report,” Said one committee member

Sure enough the paper was delayed (and revised). By the time it was finally released, although still firmly disfavoring the use of the chips, the report was irrelevant because the policy had already been implemented.

Here is another source that may hold some sway with hard to convince officials in Oklahoma-RAND. This study illustrates some of the problems with RFID that many people may not be aware of due to the hidden nature of the ways in which information can flow and be connected. The RAND report states;

RFID tags and fine-grained access controls within a building make it possible to observe the movements of any employee all the time.”

Government and industry spokespersons are fond of explaining that the chips contain only a unique identification number, not personal information.

Gee, isn’t our social security number just a unique number? And one that the government swore would never be used as a personal identifier. If you can comprehend how the SSN is used as an identifier, then you should have no trouble comprehending how those innocent little chips could also be used in this manner.

Oklahoma officials have no trouble understanding how bits of data can be used to identify and trace someone when it applies to them!

Here is someone who ought to know about personal data collection, Dewade Langley, Director of OSBI. He understands how bits of information collected can quickly add up to a reveal an awful lot about a person. Unfortunately, these Oklahoma officials’ advocacy of personal privacy and security do not apply to the average Oklahoman. In fact they are trying to keep information that is rightfully a matter of public record, secret. But only for “special” people you understand.

“Over 100 of our employees have voiced concern because once you have a person’s full name and date of birth, you’re two-thirds of the way there if you want to steal someone’s identity.”

READ MORE; The OPEA announces that they, along with Oklahoma’s finest are going to bat for privacy rights.

Simply put;

While RFID technology has existed for decades, these new applications carry with them substantial new privacy and security risks for individuals. These risks arise due to a combination of aspects involved in these applications:

1) The transponders are permanently embedded in objects individuals commonly carry with them

2) Static data linkable to an individual is stored on these transponders

3) The objects these transponders are embedded in are used in public places where individuals have limited control over who can access data on the transponder.

Read more
Security and Privacy Risks of Embedded RFID in Everyday Things: the e-Passport and Beyond

But we are supposed to believe the industry lobbyists when they tell us that a unique number on an auto identification device that is embedded in our driver’s license that can be remotely read and associated with us is no threat?

If that is the case, why don’t we just put our social security number on our foreheads?! Why the fuss about any unique number associated with a particular person? Shall we take the word of Richard Chace over the Government Accountability Office (GAO)?

The GAO states;

The widespread adoption of the technology can contribute to the increased occurrence of these privacy issues. As previously mentioned, tags can be read by any compatible reader. If readers and tags become ubiquitous, tagged items carried by an individual can be scanned unbeknownst to that individual. Further, the increased presence of readers can provide more opportunities for data to be collected and aggregated –Government Accountability Office, Report to Congressional Requesters: Information Security: Radio Frequency Identification Technology in the Federal Government, GAO-05-551

And also:

In Congressional testimony, March 2007, a GAO official cautioned against the use of RFID technology to track individuals;

“Once a particular individual is identified through an RFID tag, personally identifiable information can be retrieved from any number of sources and then aggregated to develop a profile of the individual. Both tracking and profiling can compromise an individual’s privacy,” –Linda D. Koontz, Dir., Info. Mgmt. Issues, Gov’t Accountability Office

Why should Oklahoma legislators be more interested in keeping the door open for future placement of radio frequency tech on our ID cards and DL’s than in protecting us from these imposed risks?


Whose rights are they protecting by voting against a measure that would have prohibited the use of RFID technology in our state Driver’s licenses or other identity cards?

Government mandated auto id devices on our documents that are required for access to many of our daily necessities is a possibility that looms large with legislation and laws like REAL ID, PASS ID, and even the proposed “immigration reform” bill that would require a government verified biometric ID card giving us permission to work.

We have a vested interest in the systems of access control that our government has made clear it intends to implement widely. The enhanced drivers licenses and new passport cards that utilize EPC Gen 2 RFID devices are simply the beginning.

This is an area where our state legislators can and should play a key role and be willing to stand in the gap for us.

The industry has freely exerted its power to quash potentially
revealing reviews.


Here is an example of HID Global taking action to protect their interests by taking steps to gag a security researcher in order to keep him from alerting the public about the insecure nature of their product.

The researcher says;“Our intent was to disseminate information so people could make informed decisions about RFID technology they’re deploying. For example, whether to deploy a proximity card with a secondary factor like a biometric or PIN [personal ID number]. But we’ve been prevented by HID from discussing that, and we believe it’s detrimental to the security community,”

HID global is the very same international company that endeavored to
emasculate HB 2569, Oklahoma’s anti-RFID bill.

The assurances that RFID technology will not be used to track or monitor us falls flat.

Another expert, IBM, received approval for a patent in 2006 ”Identification and tracking of persons using RFID-tagged items” is the name of this invention. IBM explains how to collect information about people that could be ”used to monitor the movement of the person through the store or other areas.”

The patent makes clear, IBM’s invention could work in other public places, ”such as shopping malls, airports, train stations, bus stations, elevators, trains, airplanes, restrooms, sports arenas, libraries, theaters, museums, etc. Read more; http://www.katu.com/internal?st=print&id=14453392&path=/news/tech


We are being told that the inclusion of radio frequency technology is a necessary security feature.

” but the risks of eavesdropping, cloning, and skimming arguably open the e-Passport holder to greater risks than the original paper-based design.”

source

The idea of a global identity card is frightening enough. It is even more galling to learn that the US insisted that these new ID cards be built in the most insecure manner, blocking proposals to protect RFID chips placed in identity documents with security measures that are sufficient to protect the privacy of their bearers. Source

Yet when presented with an opportunity to give the people of this state a measure of protection, many Oklahoma lawmakers due to partisanship, ignorance or personal gain choose not to do so.

I know that I am not alone in my sense of betrayal.

Everyone should make sure that the override vote avoiders and the ones that opposed HB 2569 have ample information that demonstrates that the SIA and HID Global are not being forthright. We must demand our elected officials vote according to our best interests and NOT the financial interests of the lobbyists!

They need to know that we will not forget their betrayal come election season and will make sure that their constituents have all the information they need to cast a well informed vote!

On the May 11, 2010 override vote 69 House members voted in favor of the override, 19 against and 13 were excused. Out of the 13 who were excused, only 3 were actually absent from the Capitol.

The 13 who did not cast a vote on May 11th

Contacted them and asked if they would be so kind as to cast their vote in favor of HB 2569 which would indicate a desire to serve the interests of their constituents over those of the industry promoters.

  1. Neil Brannon – neilbrannon@okhouse.gov 1-405-557-7413
  2. Mike Brown – mikebrown@okhouse.gov 1-405-557-7408
  3. John Carey – johncarey@okhouse.gov 1-405-557-7366
  4. Lee Denney – leedenney@okhouse.gov 1-405-557-7304  (says she will vote yes)
  5. Wes Hilliard – weshilliard@okhouse.gov 1-405-557-7412
  6. Chuck Hoskin -chuck.hoskin@okhouse.gov 1-405-557-7319
  7. Scott Inman – scott.inman@okhouse.gov 1-405-557-7370
  8. Danny Morgan – dannymorgan@okhouse.gov 1-405-557-7368
  9. Richard Morrissette – richardmorrissette@okhouse.gov 1-405-557-7404
  10. Bill Nations – billnations@okhouse.gov 1-405-557-7323
  11. Mike Shelton – mikeshelton@okhouse.gov 1-405-557-7367  (walked vote)
  12. John Trebilcock – johntrebilcock@okhouse.gov 1-405-557-7362  (says he will vote yes)
  13. Purcy Walker – purcywalker@okhouse.gov 1-405-557-7311

OK House Toll Free Number: 1-800-522-8502.

No Votes on May 11th-These legislators voted AGAINST a veto override for HB 2569

We are in the midst of a revolution in computing technology. Our ability to transfer data, store it and collect it has made rapid gains that far exceed our ability to make adequate adjustments in our thinking or our laws and the policies that we develop today can go a long way in preventing dangerous ethical shifts that are being driven by the unholy marriage of corporate financial interests and government security concerns.


It is this dynamic duo is producing a climate of wholesale fear mongering and a result we are being inundated with false solutions that fatten the wallets of executives and give cover to the politicians eager to ingratiate themselves with said executives.

All Oklahomans and their representatives should be outraged by the fact that the technology industry is directing state policy in this manner.


Veto Override Fails in House 5/11/10 – Politics ‘As Usual.’ Who Walked the Vote? 2nd Chance to Override Veto of HB 2569

Action Alert courtesy of OK-Safe, Inc.

Kudos to researcher Kaye Beach, at AxXiom for Liberty, who found the letter a big-government special interest group sent to Governor Brad Henry on April 26, 2010 asking him to veto HB 2569.  Richard Chace, CEO of SIA (Security Industry Association, headquartered in Alexandria, VA), believes that what the people of Oklahoma want shouldn’t interfere with the interests of their international members. Big-government lobbyist Jim Dunlap represents HID Global, a member of SIA. Dunlap is the same lobbyist who worked to amend HB 2569 to allow for RFID tracking tags in the OK DL/ID cards.  Neither SIA or HID Global are located in OK, which demonstrates the fact that outside interest groups can dictate which legislation get passed or not in Oklahoma.

Rep. Paul Wesselhoft rallying support for a 2nd attempt to override the Governor’s veto of HB 2569.

Calls/Emails/Visits needed to those listed below – they work!
Contact these 13 legislators who did not participate in this vote and ask for a Yes vote on a 2nd veto override vote on HB 2569:

  1. Neil Brannon – neilbrannon@okhouse.gov 1-405-557-7413
  2. Mike Brown – mikebrown@okhouse.gov 1-405-557-7408
  3. John Carey – johncarey@okhouse.gov 1-405-557-7366
  4. Lee Denney – leedenney@okhouse.gov 1-405-557-7304  (says she will vote yes)
  5. Wes Hilliard – weshilliard@okhouse.gov 1-405-557-7412
  6. Chuck Hoskin -chuck.hoskin@okhouse.gov 1-405-557-7319
  7. Scott Inman – scott.inman@okhouse.gov 1-405-557-7370
  8. Danny Morgan – dannymorgan@okhouse.gov 1-405-557-7368
  9. Richard Morrissette – richardmorrissette@okhouse.gov 1-405-557-7404
  10. Bill Nations – billnations@okhouse.gov 1-405-557-7323
  11. Mike Shelton – mikeshelton@okhouse.gov 1-405-557-7367  (walked vote)
  12. John Trebilcock – johntrebilcock@okhouse.gov 1-405-557-7362  (says he will vote yes)
  13. Purcy Walker – purcywalker@okhouse.gov 1-405-557-7311

OK House Toll Free Number: 1-800-522-8502.
Direct Dial: 1-405-521-2711

Background:

The attempted override of Governor Brad Henry’s veto of HB 2569 failed in the OK House on 5/11/10.

HB 2569, a very popular bill by Rep. Paul Wesselhoft of the House and Sen. Dan Newberry of the Senate, prohibits “the imbedding, affixing, adhering, or assigning of a radio frequency identification tag (RFID) or RFID-type ink into or onto the OK drivers license or state-issued ID cards.”

Due to the emergency clause attached to the bill, a 75% majority is needed for a veto override, rather than the normal 2/3 majority.

The vote, held early in last Tuesday’s session, failed by a vote of 69 Yes to 19 Nay; 13 House members were ‘Excused’.

Several legislators debated for the override, with division, unfortunately, falling along party lines, thanks to the lobbying effort by the Governor to the Democrat caucus, making the override vote a political issue rather than a policy stand.  [There is some talk that the big-government paid lobbyist who tried to amend HB 2569 to allow RFID tags also visited the governor on this bill.]

Not all Democrats followed the Pied Piper, however.

The following 8 Democrats took a position based on doing what is right vs. doing what is wrong – Rep. John Auffet, Rep. Dennis Bailey, Rep. Joe Dorman, Rep. Rebecca Hamilton, Rep. Eric Proctor, Rep. R.C. Pruett, Rep. Seneca Scott, and Rep. Ben Sherrer.  These 8 Democrats stood on principle and actually voted for the override.

Of the 13 ‘excused’ representatives who did not vote, by best calculations 2 were actually absent: Rep. John Carey and Rep. Chuck Hoskin (new baby).

The other 11 were somewhere in or near the chamber.

Of these 11, Rep. Lee Denney (R-Cushing) was in the Speaker’s office and so missed the vote.  It is unclear where some of the others were.

By more than one witness account, Rep. Mike Shelton, (D-Oklahoma County), was actually in the Chambers during the vote but chose to not cast a vote.  When the Chair reminded the House members that House rules state that all members present in the Chamber must cast a vote, Mike Shelton walked out.   Who else ‘walked the vote’ is being checked by verifying the House attendance sheet, which is part of the official record.

Shelton, most will remember, is the same grandstanding legislator who attached an amendment to SB 2018, expanding the definition of a ‘criminal street gang’ to include:
“Criminal street gang” means any ongoing organization, association, or group of five or more persons including, but not limited to, the Christian Knights of the Ku Klux Klan, Knights of the Ku Klux Klan, Aryan Brotherhood and any independent military organization that is neither recognized nor authorized by the Commander in Chief of the Militia for the State of Oklahoma…

SB 2018, with the dangerous Shelton amendment, passed the House in April 98-1, with Rep. Charles Key being the lone NO vote.

Just in time to coincide with sensation-seeking MSNBC’s creation of ‘militia-madness-month,’ to boost ratings for their April 19th ’special’ on the Timothy McVeigh Tapes.

Thankfully, the OK Senate rejected the Shelton amendment. SB 2018 is pending somewhere in a conference committee process. (Link to Status of Measure: http://webserver1.lsb.state.ok.us/WebBillStatus/main.html)

Rep. Paul Wesselhoft is rallying support for another attempt at a veto override on HB 2569, a bill very important to the people of Oklahoma.  Call the above legislators and ask for their support for a veto override.

Pray for an end to politics ‘as usual’ and for principled statesmen to arise in the Oklahoma Legislature to override the veto of HB 2569.

Thank you,

OK-SAFE, Inc.
_____________________________________________________

Prohibiting RFID tracking tags in our drivers license is neither an R or D issue – it is an Oklahoma issue.

Governor Brad Henry contact information:

  • Direct: 1-405-521-2342
  • Toll Free: 1-800-865-5853
  • Fax: 1-405-521-3352
  • Email:  Follow this link to send a message to Gov. Henry -http://www.governor.state.ok.us/message.php
Diligence is always necessary in preserving liberty. Once successfully overridden in the House, calls will be needed in the Senate for that same override vote.

Thank you very much for your help with this urgent matter
OK-SAFE, Inc.