Tag Archives: ibm

Smartworld: Identity Profiling With Radio Frequency

Kaye Beach

September 6, 2012

Excellent, information and reference packed article!  More than you ever wanted to know about RFID.

Published Sept. 4, 2012

Julie Beal, Contributor
Activist Post

RFID, or radio frequency identification (also known as near field communication, or NFC) is used for wireless communication between devices, one of which is a transmitter and the other is a receiver. This involves the use of low frequency radio waves passing between the devices; it is in widespread use, although the impact on health is rarely alluded to. RFID is being used for a multitude of applications involving sensing and communication of information, especially ID verification using smart cards/phones, miniscule sensors known as smart dust, bodily implants, and product tracking.

There are already many well-established ID Management companies who are also using or advocating RFID and biometrics. These companies are heavily involved in the emerging global identity ecosystem (eg, the NSTIC program, the work of the ITU, and the European initiatives, including STORK), and include Accenture, IBM, Verisign/Symantec and Oracle. The industry has grown significantly and the trend looks set to continue – especially considering the heavy investment by leading corporations like Google, IBM, and Microsoft.

The smart card industry is playing a leading role in identity management, indicating that in the near future the public will expect to manage their digitised identity with extrinsic devices such as contactless cards and mobile phones.

In Denver, for instance, Auraria Higher Education Center recently decided to issue new contactless smart cards to students (over 43,000 of them), and to staff. The cards will control door access using RFID, and will even serve as Visa debit cards. The plan is to eventually integrate the cards with other applications for student services, including parking, meal payment, library checkout, event management, emergency incidents, and lab and recreational tracking.

Read more

“Claims that the technology will be used to track people are inaccurate” Paul Sund

May 11, 2010 the Oklahoma House which previously passed HB 2569 by a wide margin (76-13 with 12 excused) failed to get enough votes to override the Governor’s Veto of the Radio Frequency ID bill.

Henry spokesman Paul Sund thanked the lawmakers for reviewing the legislation and sustaining the governor’s veto.

“It made no sense to prospectively ban technology that can provide future benefits,” Sund said. “Claims that the technology will be used to track people are inaccurate.”

Read more about the failed veto override vote on May 11, 2010 in this Tulsa World article

SIA CEO Richard Chace says in his letter to Gov. Henry;

“Unfortunately, this legislation reflects common misperceptions about RFID applications that are based upon twisted facts and emotions generated by ill-informed “privacy rights” advocates.”

And

“Governor, please be assured that safeguarding the privacy of personal information collected through government-issued identification documents is of paramount concern to our membership”. Read the letter

More; Oklahoma Law Makers Led Astry...

How long till the lies our trusted official told us becomes painfully apparent to Oklahomans?

The clock is ticking as the use of RFID for TRACKING purposes accelerate. How long until the people in this state are mandated to carry the devious devices?  Anyone want to place their bets?

Japanese company NEC wowed technophiles and horrified privacy advocates earlier this year with electronic billboards that use facial recognition technology to identify the age and gender of passers-by, tailoring the ads they display to fit the demographic. Now IBM researchers in the UK are taking that notion even further, taking advantage of new technologies to delve deeper into the personal data of people on the street, tailoring advertisements that can even call the subject by name.

The billboards they are developing rely on the RFID chips that are increasingly being built into credit cards and cell phones as a means of storing data that is accessible by contact-free sensors (like the “touch pay” feature on some credit and debit cards that doesn’t require the user to swipe). A sensor on the billboard picks up on that RFID signal as the cardholder passes by, tapping information like name, age, gender, shopping habits, and personal preferences.

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“Fascism should more appropriately be called Corporatism because it is a merger of State and corporate power.”

Benito Mussolini

 

And we thought the Scameras were bad! IBM Patent to Stop Car Engines Remotely

Once they have their foot in the door, tagging, tracking and monitoring us, why not?

Ax

IBM patent goes Big Brother

Running red lights and failure to stop leads to untold numbers of traffic accidents around the world. Sitting at a red light with cars idling also burns fuel that really isn’t needed.

IBM has filed a patent application that outlines a system that would turn the motors of a car off at a traffic light to conserve fuel. Few will take issue with green technology that conserves fuel, saves them money, and reduces pollution. However, there is a dark side to the patent application that privacy advocates will not like.

The system IBM is proposing has to have access to the engine of the vehicles at the light to stop the engine. With access to the engine, the traffic lights can not only stop the engine of a driver’s car, but it can also determine the duration that the engine is stopped and then when the light is over it can start the motors of the cars up in sequential order so the first cars at the light get to go first. The system would use GPS data to know where vehicles were located at the light.

Read more;

http://www.dailytech.com/IBM%20Patent%20Application%20Describes%20Intelligent%20Stop%20Lights%20That%20Turn%20Off%20Cars/article18514.htm

IBM’s Crime Prediction Software

From Orwell’s Dreams

There are no naked pre-cogs inside glowing jacuzzis yet, but the Florida State Department of Juvenile Justice will use analysis software to predict crime by young delinquents, putting potential offenders under specific prevention and education programs. Goodbye, human rights!

They will use this software on juvenile delinquents, using a series of variables to determine the potential for these people to commit another crime. Depending on this probability, they will put them under specific re-education programs. Deepak Advani—vice president of predictive analytics at IBM—says the system gives “reliable projections” so governments can take “action in real time” to “prevent criminal activities?”

Really? “Reliable projections”? “Action in real time”? “Preventing criminal activities”? I don’t know about how reliable your system is, IBM, but have you ever heard of the 5th, the 6th, and the 14th Amendments to the United States Constitution?

Read More;

http://orwellsdreams.wordpress.com/2010/04/18/crime-prediction-software-is-here-and-it-is-a-very-bad-idea/