Tag Archives: mobile

State’s Giving Feds Trolling Rights to DMV Facial Biometric Databases

Biometrics getting personal

Kaye Beach

June 17, 2013

The Washington Post published what is probably one of the most comprehensive and clear (major media) articles to date on the state departments of motor vehicles’ biometric databases and how they are increasingly being utilized to undermine the presumption of innocence and rob us of our right to be left alone.

State photo-ID databases become troves for police

“Facial-recognition systems are more pervasive and can be deployed remotely, without subjects knowing that their faces have been captured.   Today’s driver’s-license databases, which also include millions of images of people who get non-driver ID cards to open bank accounts or board airplanes, typically were made available for police searches with little public notice.”

The Washington Post reports;

“Thirty-seven states now use ­facial-recognition technology in their driver’s-license registries, a Washington Post review found. At least 26
of those allow state, local or federal law enforcement agencies to search — or request searches — of photo databases. . .”

The Washington Post also notes that;

“The current version of the Senate’s immigration bill would dramatically expand an electronic photo-verification system, probably relying on access to driver’s-license registries.”

The New York Times reported on this a few days ago;

WASHINGTON — Driver’s license photographs and biographic information of most Americans would be accessible through an expanded Department of Homeland Security nationwide computer network if the immigration legislation pending before the Senate becomes law.

. . . the Senate bill would direct the department to expand the photo program by offering grants to states if they allow the department to tap into their driver’s license photo records

Read more; Fears of National ID With Immigration Bill

The Constitutional Alliance first sounded  the alarm on April 17th;

“If you want to work, travel, buy, or sell you will be forced to be enrolled into this global system of identification.” 

Read more from the Constitutional Alliance; You are being enrolled into a global identity scheme which controls your ability to buy, sell, travel and now work !!!

Our government is working diligently to ‘connect the dots’  We need to do the same – please read the Washington Post’s article on the state’s biometric databases along with  the ones linked above.

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Targeted Interstate Photo Sharing (TIPS): Homeland Security, NLETS and the IACP Target Your Biometric Driver’s License Photo

target dl 1

Kaye Beach

Dec. 29, 2012

In the modern surveillance state it’s all about the biometrics, especially facial recognition which allows for at-a-distance identification and investigation of individuals without their knowledge or consent-no warrant required!

Very few realize that upon issuance of a state driver’s license, a state identification card, or any other form of government issued photo ID, we are having our facial biometrics captured by high resolution photography.  The analog cameras in every state have been replaced with high resolution digital cameras that capture, map, digitize, and database our facial features for use with facial recognition technology.

The federal REAL ID Act was passed in 2005.  The first (and most important!) benchmark of REAL ID is capture and retention of the driver’s license applicant’s facial image.

A Picture Is Worth a Thousand Words

The following is from an article published in Nov. of this year by the Police Chief, the official magazine of the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP);

(“Image” means biometric image which is quite different than a simple photograph)

“In 2006, the National Institute of Justice (NIJ) and the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), Science and Technology (S&T) Directorate gave the International Justice and Public Safety Network (Nlets) funds to implement driver’s license image sharing between the states. Nlets is a nonprofit organization owned by the 50 states that has connections to every federal, state, local, and military law enforcement agency in the United States. If an agency’s technical capabilities allow, officers can query state driver’s license databases from a mobile or a desktop device and obtain an image in a manner of seconds.”

A Picture Is Worth a Thousand Words, From The Police Chief, vol. LXXIX, no. , November 2012. Copyright held by the International Association of Chiefs of Police, 515 North Washington Street, Alexandria, VA 22314 USA

Your state department of public safety or DMV driver’s license database provides your biometric data which tethers your body to other unique biographical data such as your social security number, age, address and more.  As a tool for surveillance and control, your faceprint is invaluable.

 “Today, more than 25 states have implemented this technology and are providing law enforcement images. In the next year, at least 12 more states will implement this technology.” A Picture Is Worth a Thousand Words

Now,  law enforcement can, simply by taking your picture, identify and investigate you as you go about your business in public without you even being aware that this is happening.

“For some time now, officers have been able to retrieve images through a mobile device while on the street to help identify individuals.” A Picture Is Worth a Thousand Words

The truth is that they cannot do this everywhere, yet.  While the technology is in place there is still the issue of access to be dealt with.  This is a legal and not a technical matter.  As we know, if the government has the technical ability to do something, they believe that they should be able to do it.  In other words, the law must conform to the capability of the technology and not the other way around.  Policy, once (somewhat) grounded in principle is now rooted in practice so now if they can do it, they will do it and they are doing it.

Undercover cops secretly use smartphones, face recognition to spy on crowds

This kind of surveillance is damaging.   Psychologically, pervasive surveillance, or even the possibility of it, is universally understood to change the behavior of those subjected to it.  It induces conformity of behavior and of thought as well.  As the range of surveillance grows, our ability to simply be, to exercise our free will, shrinks.

“Nlets will not consider photo sharing a success until it is implemented in all 50 states” link

Targeted Interstate Photo Sharing (TIPS)

“Nlets and DHS S&T have been working to expand the use of images in public safety. A new DHS/Nlets project called Targeted Interstate Photo Sharing (TIPS)” A Picture Is Worth a Thousand Words

NLETS formerly the National Law Enforcement Telecommunications Service is now THE INTERNATIONAL JUSTICE & PUBLIC SAFETY NETWORK

NLETS

“links together every state, local, and federal and International law enforcement (INTERPOL), justice and public safety agency for the purpose of exchanging critical information.”  http://www.nlets.org/

As this law enforcement writer notes,

“when we engage in innovative law enforcement technology solutions, we need to take extra care to adequately address the security and privacy of personally identifiable information.”  

And who does the writer fear, is not adequately addressing the security and privacy of our personally identifiable information?  Good old NLETS.

Read; When the Cops are Worried About Your Privacy-You Should Worry Too!

NLETS role has always been to serve the state’s law enforcement needs, but that role, as noted by NLETS, is changing.

From Hot Trends and Innovations at Nlets 2012 Slide # 42

While Nlets is 45 years old this year, we have always taken the “child” role, with the States being the “parent”

–In recent years, the child is becoming the parent in many aspects.

Why? For one thing NLETS is now being funded and thus, directed by the federal government.

nlets grant funders Hot trends innovations ppt 2012Slide # 47

Slide # 17

From Hot Trends and Innovations at Nlets 2012

PROJECT SPONSOR

Department of Homeland Security

When lines of authority are blurred, power naturally defaults to the highest level.  The states are not ‘partners’ with the federal government in matters that require state authority over their jurisdiction.

From the Legal Information Institute;

Jurisdiction-The term jurisdiction is really synonymous with the word “power”

Jurisdiction is the territory within which a court or government agency may properly exercise its power

State and local policing is a jurisdictional matter and the states and local governments have conceded their authority in this.  Informational jurisdiction is no exception and in fact leads physical control.

What is revealed in this IACP Nov. 2012 article is that the Department of Homeland Security has funded an international non-governmental organization, the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP), to manage the operational issues of the endeavor; Targeted Interstate Photo Sharing (TIPS).

“The DHS S&T has funded the IACP Technology Center to provide a practitioner group to advise Nlets on operational issues. These experienced practitioners will provide input on how this technology can be used in the field.”

What that means is that we are in trouble. 

The IACP is an international, non-governmental organization accredited by the United Nations and has been instrumental in bringing about profound changes to our nation politically, technologically and culturally.  There has been a great paradigm shift in our nation since 9-11 that spans all agencies of government.  This shift affects every aspect of our lives and has practically decimated the US Constitution and Bill of Rights.  US citizens, regardless of their political persuasion, are united in astonishment as they witness the slash and burn abrogation of one cherished right after another.

There is no sector of our society left untouched by the new paradigm and each has its own specialists attending to the transformation in their particular realm.  In the realm of policing, it is the IACP who is in charge of nurturing and tending this transformation.

Here is just one example;

Intelligence Led Policing and Fusion Centers: How the IACP Helped the USA to Cross the Rubicon

I hate to share information like this without providing you with any solutions.  I have been working diligently for years to find a way for us to protect our biometric data which is the key to our government’s efforts to create the most effective and efficient surveillance society ever experienced on this earth.

Although I have found no solution in legislation, no real willingness by enough of our elected representatives to do what they took an oath to do; to protect our liberty I do still recommend that you contact your state representative and tell them if you have concerns about open access to your data contained in the state Dept. of Public Safety database.  Tell them that you expect them to protect your personal information from being freely shared and used on a whim to track and spy on you.  They need to hear concerns from their constituents.

It is clear that we cannot stop the government from sharing this information in ways that will hurt our ability to control our own lives.   If we want to protect ourselves we must remove our biometrics from the system by either not giving it to them in the first place or taking legal action to remove it.

That is what I am trying to do, remove my biometric data from the system.  There is just no good reason for it being collected in the first place and no one ever informed me or you of what was being taken from us when we applied for our state driver’s license and they certainly never warned us about the repercussions of trusting them with our most personal information.

Read more about my lawsuit

My Real ID Reckoning

Latest update and request for support

Stop Biometric ID!  Kaye Beach needs your support for lawsuit

Travelers checks: Automatic License Plate Readers track your every move

Kaye Beach

August 22, 2011

Here is good article on ALPR technology.

Source;  Carol Rose, On Liberty Community Blog at Boston.com

Remember the furor this spring, when we learned that iPhones and other mobile devices were logging every move their users made? Automatic License Plate Readers (ALPRs) would do something similar to your car.

Late last year, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts advertised a $300,000 grant from the federal Department of Transportation for the purchase of ALPRs. Over 90 agencies in the state applied; 27 were given the grant money.

Many of these towns (see a full list here) have already implemented the technology. At least one, Brookline, is currently struggling with whether or not to accept the funds and implement an ALPR.

ALPRs are not ordinary cameras. Attached to police cruisers, or fixed on telephone poles or other stationary places, the cameras snap an image of nearly every license plate they encounter. The device produces a file for each image captured, which includes searchable text displaying the time, date and GPS location of the car when and where the plate was ‘read’. This information is fed into a database, where it can be shared with other agencies and databases, and “mined” or analyzed.

One of the major problems with ALPR technology is that it sucks up all license plates, not simply those associated with people suspected of wrongdoing. Therefore as the technology expands, it is possible that law enforcement will be able to track your movements with incredible precision as you go about your daily life in your car. Without proper privacy protections backed by the force of law, ALPRs become yet another tracking technology.

Read more

Law Enforcement to Use Facial Recognition Equipment

Kaye Beach

July 30, 2011

“Surveillance comes with a price. It dulls the edge of public debate, imposes a sense of conformity and introduces the uneasy feeling of being watched. It chills culture and stifles dissent. … The new legal authorities and the government’s partnership with private information companies now pose a direct threat to this three-decade-old effort toward openness. … Their capabilities have raced far ahead of the nation’s understanding and laws. The legacy of these efforts will be with us for many years.”

Robert O Harrow- Nowhere to Hide

by Raven Clabough

July 14, 2011

July Law enforcement officers across the country are preparing to make widespread use of facial recognition equipment to identify people based on a picture of their face or a scan of their iris, or on a fingerprint reader. And concerns have already been raised among the liberty-minded over how the information would be gathered and used. The Mobile Offender Recognition and Information System (MORIS), produced by B12 Technologies of Plymouth, Massachusetts, runs on the iphone platform. B12 officials report that the company already has contracts with 40 government agencies to deliver 1,000 devices

Read More

Sheriff’s Dept. Confirms Real ID Drivers Licenses Now Part Of Facial Recognition System

Kaye Beach

April 1, 2011

This is how Real ID is making the people in Floirida safer…

 

Posted March 12, 2011

1787 Network Exclusive – by Adrian Wyllie

DUNEDIN, FLORIDA – The Pinellas County Sheriff’s Office confirmed this week that images taken from Florida drivers’ licenses have now been integrated into a multi-jurisdictional facial recognition database used by law enforcement agencies throughout Florida.

Since January 1, 2010, the Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles (DHSMV) has been in full compliance with the Real ID Act of 2005. This federal law, administered by the Department of Homeland Security, mandates that states “subject each person applying for a driver’s license or identification card to mandatory facial image capture.”   These facial image caputures are required to be compatible with facial recognition software.  The law also requires that these facial image captures be combined with digital scans of identification documents, such as birth certificates and social security cards, and be uploaded to a national database.

“We are in a pilot program with DHSMV,” said Scott McCallum, Administrator of Facial Recognition Systems for the Pinellas County Sheriff’s Office (PCSO). “We also have the ability to perform a [facial recognition] search against the civilian repository, the drivers’ license data set,” McCallum said, “we’ve been able to go ahead and verify identity in near real time at street level.”

That means that all of the PCSO’s facial recognition cameras, both at fixed locations and mobile units used by deputies, can now almost instantly identify any person who has a Real ID compliant drivers’ license or state identification card.

Read More

This image from Panasonic shows how new facial recognition cameras eliminate windshield glare to capture faces in moving vehicles.

Smart Card Alliance Lays Out Roadmap for US “Chip Card” Usage

Smart Card Alliance Conference Focuses on U.S. Roadmaps to EMV and Secure ID

PRINCETON JUNCTION, NJ–(Marketwire – March 14, 2011) – The Smart Card Alliance announced today that the theme of its 2011 Annual Conference will be “The Roadmap to EMV Payments and Secure ID,” where attendees can look forward to presentations and discussions on the advancement and growing adoption of smart card technology in EMV, contactless and mobile payments, and secure identification.

What is an EMV payment??

According to Wikipedia:

EMV stands for Europay, MasterCard and VISA, the global standard for inter-operation of integrated circuit cards (IC cards or “chip cards”) and IC card capable point of sale (POS) terminals and automated teller machines (ATMs), for authenticating credit and debit card transactions.

IC card systems based on EMV are being phased in across the world, under names such as “IC Credit” and “Chip and PIN

Read More

“We see 2011 as the year where the payments industry seriously examines EMV payments and preparations for mobile payments pick up speed. At the same time, federal, state and local governments will launch new citizen ID programs for the Internet and expand the use of current secure ID programs,” (Emphasis mine) said Randy Vanderhoof, executive director of the Smart Card Alliance. “Our annual conference is the ideal time for all of the stakeholders in these markets to come together to learn about the role that smart card technology plays in all of these applications, and look seriously at the next steps to make all of these projects a success.”

The Smart Card Alliance 2011 Annual Conference will allow professionals in the payments and security markets to gather together to share use cases and best practices, meet vendors in the large exhibit hall, witness live demonstrations, network with industry peers, and more.

The remainder of the conference program will be divided into two tracks — Payments, and ID and Security –– that will cover the requirements and technology approaches for secure payment and identity applications. Topics include:

  • Secure EMV payments and impact on fraud
  • U.S. roadmap options and readiness for EMV
  • Mobile and NFC-enabled access and payments implementations
  • Federal, state and local identity management initiatives
  • Programs to secure identity in cyberspace
  • Healthcare identity management

Pre-conference, on May 2nd, attendees can choose to attend one of the three pre-conference workshops: “OTA Email Authentication Academy,” sponsored by the Online Trust Alliance; “Mobile and Contactless Payments,” sponsored by Collis; or

and I think this last line says it all:

“EMV Implementation Roadmap for the U.S.,” sponsored by the Smart Card Alliance Payments Council.

read more

Smart Card Alliance

An interesting and related article from Washington Post Opinion writer Michelle Singletary:

In the battle over debit card swipe fees, consumers will lose

When it comes to the fight over the fees that merchants pay to allow customers to use debit cards, consumers are damned if the Federal Reserve does what it has proposed to do, and they’re damned if it doesn’t.

The Federal Reserve proposed capping the fees at 12 cents per transaction, more than 70 percent lower than the 2009 average.

. . .Large banks claim that they will lose more than $12 billion in revenue if the Fed’s proposal becomes final.

. . The card issuers can threaten to increase fees – and follow through on those threats – because they have already gotten you to think that debit cards are so much better than using cash. In fact, some of you even believe that using your debit card is the same as using cash. (By the way, it isn’t.)

So it appears we can’t win this fight. Even with lower swipe fees, there’s no guarantee that merchants would lower retail prices to reflect the break they would be getting.

SWIPE THE FED

The best bit of info in the whole article is the writer’s suggestion;

I have a wild and wacky idea. What if we just went back to using cash? Better yet, let’s all begin to negotiate more for lower prices on our purchases if we pay in cash.

Our rebellion against electronic payments would show merchants and financial institutions that we still have some economic power. We don’t have to be damned whichever way this debit battle goes. Read more

I like that idea!

Documents Reveal TSA Research Proposal To Body-Scan Pedestrians, Train Passengers

Documents Reveal TSA Research Proposal To Body-Scan Pedestrians, Train Passengers
by Andy Greenberg

Giving Transportation Security Administration agents a peek under your clothes may soon be a practice that goes well beyond airport checkpoints. Newly uncovered documents show that as early as 2006, the Department of Homeland Security has been planning pilot programs to deploy mobile scanning units that can be set up at public events and in train stations, along with mobile x-ray vans capable of scanning pedestrians on city streets. The non-profit Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC) on Wednesday published documents it obtained from the Department of Homeland Security showing that from 2006 to 2008 the agency planned a study of of new anti-terrorism technologies that EPIC believes raise serious privacy concerns. The projects range from what the DHS describes as “a walk through x-ray screening system that could be deployed at entrances to special events or other points of interest” to “covert inspection of moving subjects” employing the same backscatter imaging technology currently used in American airports. The 173-page collection of contracts and reports, acquired through a Freedom of Information Act request, includes contracts with Siemens Corporations, Northeastern University, and Rapiscan Systems. The study was expected to cost more than $3.5 million. One project allocated to Northeastern University and Siemens would mount backscatter x-ray scanners and video cameras on roving vans, along with other cameras on buildings and utility poles, to monitor groups of pedestrians, assess what they carried, and even track their eye movements. In another program, the researchers were asked to develop a system of long range x-ray scanning to determine what metal objects an individual might have on his or her body at distances up to thirty feet. “This would allow them to take these technologies out of the airport and into other contexts like public streets, special events and ground transit,” says Ginger McCall, an attorney with EPIC. “It’s a clear violation of the fourth amendment that’s very invasive, not necessarily effective, and poses all the same radiation risks as the airport scans.”

Read The Full Story:

Emergency access granted in test of interoperable ID system

Emergency access granted in test of interoperable ID system

Autumn Blend authenticates responders from federal, state and private-sector organizations

Oct 21, 2010


“Mobile and fixed devices electronically validated participants’ identities through personal identification credentials, ID numbers and biometrics. Logical access through personal identification allowed personnel to use computers for secure e-mail collaboration.

As the authentication systems cleared individuals for access to the venue, the Virginia Interoperability Picture for Emergency Response geospatial application tracked and displayed their locations in near real time at fusion and emergency operations centers across the country. ”

This is an unprecedented tracking, and control system that our government is building! You should know it will be utilized for everyone as soon as we all have the proper credentials. Real ID, smart passports, Schumer’s Biometric, RFID enabled social security card scheme, pass cards…that is what these things are for. They enable checkpoints to be placed in a snap and to control your ability to access services, areas, items.

Government employees already

It is sheer folly to give your government this much control over so many vital aspects of our lives.

A recent national emergency preparedness exercise successfully demonstrated an interoperable, electronic identity authentication system for government and private-sector personnel.

Known as Autumn Blend, the event was coordinated by the Homeland Security Department’s Federal Emergency Management Agency and Northrop Grumman. It included federal, state, local and private-sector emergency response and recovery officials.

…As the different response groups converged on the site, their personal identification credentials were electronically scanned at different authentication points to grant physical and data access during the demonstration.

.. . Mobile and fixed devices electronically validated participants’ identities through personal identification credentials, ID numbers and biometrics. Logical access through personal identification allowed personnel to use computers for secure e-mail collaboration.

As the authentication systems cleared individuals for access to the venue, the Virginia Interoperability Picture for Emergency Response geospatial application tracked and displayed their locations in near real time at fusion and emergency operations centers across the country.

Autumn Blend participants included:

  • DHS.
  • FEMA.
  • Buckley Air Force Base in Colorado.
  • Pentagon Force Protection Agency.
  • Pennsylvania Emergency Management Agency.
  • Southwest Texas Regional Advisory Council for Trauma.
  • Northrop Grumman’s Newport News shipbuilding sector.
  • Newport News fire department.
  • Virginia Governor’s Office of Commonwealth Preparedness.
  • Technology partners such as ActivIdentity, CertiPath and Monitor Dynamics.

Read more

iPhone iSpy Apps for Robo Cops

Meanwhile, there are other noteworthy developments on the high-tech police gear front. A new iPhone app that can instantly identify suspects is being tested out by a Massachusetts police department, PC World reports. Using facial recognition software, the app — called MORIS (Mobile Offender Recognition and Identification System) — allows officers to point their mobile phones at a person to call up identifying information. If a biometric match is found, information associated with that person is immediately sent back to the iPhone.
Read more:

http://www.sfbg.com/politics/2010/07/28/big-brother-body-cams-face-recognition-apps-and-liquid-body-armor

DHS Directorate Update-People Screening Tech

Kaye Beach

March 29, 2009

I just found this online and have been shocked into a rare state of speechlessness but expect to be fully recovered by Monday morning when I will visit the Capitol to ask our legislators to PLEASE STOP THIS!

The below is just what I copied and pasted because it jumped out at me.  You can find the entire article at http://www.dhs.gov/ynews/testimony/testimony_1238089175289.shtm


Testimony of Acting Under Secretary Bradley I. Buswell, Science and Technology Directorate, before the House Committee on Appropriations, Subcommittee on Homeland Security, “Science and Technology Research and Transitioning Products Into Use”Release

Date: March 26, 2009

Rayburn House Office Building
(Remarks as Prepared)

Good Morning, Chairman Price, Ranking Member Rogers, and distinguished Members of the Committee. I am honored to appear before you today to update you on the progress of the Department of Homeland Security’s (DHS) Science and Technology Directorate (S&T Directorate). I also plan to detail the Directorate’s many accomplishments from the past year; discuss current programs on track to provide future technological capabilities to our customers, the operating components of DHS and our Nation’s first responders; and describe how our efforts are helping to unify the Department.Process

Basic Research. The Directorate’s basic research portfolio addresses long-term research and development needs in support of DHS mission areas that will provide the nation with an enduring capability in homeland security. This type of focused research investment has the potential to lead to paradigm shifts in the nation’s homeland security capabilities through investment in our universities, government laboratories, and the private sector.

 

 

People Screening

The Directorate is developing a variety of technologies and knowledge products that can assist our law enforcement officers in differentiating between law-abiding individuals and those who mean to break our laws or do us harm. As we conduct this research, we are diligent in honoring the rights of Americans. S&T works closely with the DHS Privacy Office and the Office of Civil Rights and Civil Liberties (CRCL) to ensure that our research protects both individual rights and homeland security. Furthermore, we have a robust internal privacy compliance framework in place to ensure that all S&T-funded research that involves or impacts Personally Identifiable Information is reviewed and approved in advance by the Department’s Privacy Office. We are also collaborating with CRCL to conduct Civil Liberties Impact Assessments (CLIAs) of S&T research that could impact civil liberties. To support this program’s customers, the Directorate:

  • Deployed Mobile biometric collection technologies with the Coast Guard to identify migrants and smugglers attempting to illegally enter the United States through the waters near Puerto Rico and the Florida Straits. The program has resulted in a total of 3,143 people interdicted at sea, 269 brought ashore for prosecution – with 152 convicted so far. It is estimated that it has reduced the flow of illegal immigration in this area by 60 percent.
  • Successfully demonstrated proof-of-concept technologies to acquire high resolution, high quality single fingerprints without require physical contact. The success of this effort has resulted in coordination with DoD on future year efforts to develop less intrusive, culturally acceptable fingerprinting technologies. The demonstrated technologies also allows for the possibility to examine three-dimensional features of fingerprints for recognition, providing revolutionary capabilities for fingerprint matching and latent fingerprint examiners in the future.
  • Co-sponsored with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) the creation of the Multiple Biometrics Grand Challenge (MBGC) in order to improve face recognition performance. Early results of small data sets show near 100 percent performance when fusing face and iris biometrics together – a critical advancement for biometrics to function in non-contact applications.
  • Performed initial validation of behavioral indicators associated with possession of contraband, such as weapons, false documents, and illegal drugs. The latest analysis provides statistically significant support that persons demonstrating select behavioral indicators are more likely to possess banned/illegal items. These indicators leverage those used by DHS operational customers such as TSA and CBP.
  • Demonstrated proof of concept with TSA’s Screening Passengers by Observation Technique (SPOT) program of MobileSPOT technology, a hand-held device that will enable the extension of TSA security layers beyond the checkpoint area by enabling SPOT Behavior Detection Officers (BDOs) to wirelessly share information that is currently exchanged manually or not at all.
  • Conducted preliminary laboratory validation of behavioral indicators associated with verbal deception within a primary or secondary interview environment. These behavioral indicators distinguish deceptive from non-deceptive subjects at a statistically significant accuracy rate and are enabling the development of an automated deception detection prototype and training/training simulation materials.
  • Demonstrated a real-time stand-off system to identify behavioral indicators associated with hostile intent and deception – the first step in developing a deployed system to detect hostile intent in real time.
  • Deployed deception-detecting techniques and support materials to TSA and local law enforcement to provide them with behavioral indicators of hostile intent.
  • Developed and conducted initial validation of the Future Attribute Screening Technology (FAST) Theory of Malintent (the intent to cause harm) for a primary screening environment, identifying specific cues that are diagnostic of malintent.
  • Demonstrated FAST initial sensor integration and command and control framework.
  • Convened the Community Perceptions of Technology (CPT) Panel to understand and incorporate community perceptions in the development and deployment of critical technologies within the United States such as microwave vehicle stopping technology, Raman spectroscopy for standoff detection of explosives, mobile biometrics, and acoustic non-linear technology for standoff threat detection.

In the upcoming year, the Directorate will execute malintent detection protocols with over 400 volunteer subjects to test theories and support data analysis; deliver a multi-modal (face, iris, finger) biometrics test and evaluation framework for government-sponsored multi-modal vendor tests that set the stage for incorporation of multi-biometric collection and fusion to support higher throughput screening applications; create a multi-biometric reference research database that will be used to evaluate biometrics algorithms and system performance for use by DHS operational components and continue to improve technical performance through industry and university challenge problems; develop technologies, in coordination with DoD, to collect multiple fingerprints for biometric matching without requiring physical contact; and develop technologies and procedures to enhance screener-performance and reduce human fatigue and injury while reducing training requirements and overall cost.

Established and piloted digital image exchange specifications for the NLETS Image Sharing Program (NISP) to enable state and local law enforcement personnel to query and retrieve driver’s license photos across state lines via the NLETS network. DHS S&T partnered with the National Institute of Justice (NIJ) to examine the technical, policy, and privacy challenges of enabling law enforcement personnel to share interstate driver’s license photos for field identification and threat assessment functions. In addition to DHS and NIJ, agencies participating in the interstate photo sharing program include the International Justice and Public Safety Information Sharing Network (NLETS), the American Association of Motor Vehicle Administrators, the North Carolina Highway Patrol, and the South Carolina and Virginia State Police.

Developed a handheld device software application that retrieves digital photographs from the California Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) to enable law enforcement personnel away from their office or vehicle to quickly query, retrieve, and view California driver’s license photographs on a range of handheld devices (PDAs), greatly enhancing their ability to positively identify individuals in the field. This application was certified by California Department of Justice, and nearly 500 federal, state, and local law enforcement personnel throughout Southern California are currently participating in its operational testing.

  • to enable agencies to seamlessly share justice information.
  • Deployed the Spatial Temporal Visualization (STV) and Criminal Activity Network (CAN) visualization toolset to the Tucson Police Department. The STV tool enables crime analysts to plot suspicious or criminal incidents near critical infrastructure and explore distribution of those incidents by time period while the CAN visualization tool integrates CBP License Plate Reader data with a local criminal record set to reveal links among subjects who routinely crossed the border and are known offenders in the Tucson region.

Established and piloted digital image exchange specifications for the NLETS Image Sharing Program (NISP) to enable state and local law enforcement personnel to query and retrieve driver’s license photos across state lines via the NLETS network. DHS S&T partnered with the National Institute of Justice (NIJ) to examine the technical, policy, and privacy challenges of enabling law enforcement personnel to share interstate driver’s license photos for field identification and threat assessment functions. In addition to DHS and NIJ, agencies participating in the interstate photo sharing program include the International Justice and Public Safety Information Sharing Network (NLETS), the American Association of Motor Vehicle Administrators, the North Carolina Highway Patrol, and the South Carolina and Virginia State Police.

Developed a regional communications architecture – the State, Regional, and Federal Enterprise Retrieval System (SRFERS) – to facilitate data sharing and software integration between multi-jurisdictional criminal justice agencies separated by physical and political boundaries. SRFERS uses existing information infrastructures, such as the International Justice and Public Safety Information Sharing Network, the Automated Regional Justice Information Sharing (ARJIS) network and state networks in place to demonstrate connectivity and exchange data in real time across state lines. Through these existing networks, SRFERS provides a toolkit—consisting of successful architectural models, technical specifications for open source messaging applications, transactions and scripts, templates for information sharing agreements, and technical and policy documentation guidance—to enable agencies to seamlessly share justice information.

Deployed the Spatial Temporal Visualization (STV) and Criminal Activity Network (CAN) visualization toolset to the Tucson Police Department. The STV tool enables crime analysts to plot suspicious or criminal incidents near critical infrastructure and explore distribution of those incidents by time period while the CAN visualization tool integrates CBP License Plate Reader data with a local criminal record set to reveal links among subjects who routinely crossed the border and are known offenders in the Tucson region.

During the coming year, the Directorate plans to continue with the AZLink, and SRFERS development efforts currently underway along with continuing to deploy CIIMS, NISP, STV CAN visualization toolset and new data cubes for the ICEPIC system. New efforts will be initiated including the piloting of systems analyzing fusion center information usage and sharing; suspicious capability reporting; developing a HSPD-12-related identity management system broadly applicable across the Federal government; and piloting a geospatial analytics tool for use in fusion centers that will support situational awareness and critical decision making.